Furnald

Furnald is one of the first-year residence halls and consists largely of singles. During World War II, naval officers in training took residence here, and the hall also housed graduate students and seniors at various points. Famous past residents include Spanish poet Federico García Lorca and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Herman Wouk.

Harley-Wallach

Hartley and Wallach Halls are first-year residence halls and home to the Living Learning Center, a mixed-class community with dynamic programming. Famous former residents include poet Langston Hughes and writers Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg.

John Jay

John Jay is one of the first-year residence halls and includes a dining hall, a late-night eatery and a student lounge with a piano. John Jay also served as training quarters for US Navy midshipmen during the Second World War; they were required to refer to it as the “U.S.S. John Jay.” Famous residents have included actress Julia Stiles and former New York State Governor David Paterson.

Pupin Hall

Home of the Physics department, Pupin has hosted several breakthroughs in modern physics; it is where the uranium atom was first split (for which Pupin a National Historic Landmark) and where Isidor Rabi discovered nuclear magnetic resonance (leading to the laser and the MRI). Pupin is also home to the Rutherford Observatory, which hosts several stargazing events and lectures monthly.

Butler Library

Butler is the main library on Columbia’s campus. The “Raven Mantel,” from the farmhouse where Edgar Allen Poe wrote his famous poem, sits on the sixth floor.

“The Core has to be my favorite Columbia tradition. Even after my first year, it has opened up several conversations with complete strangers as well as other alumni. I was in an entirely new city, and ran into a Columbia College alumnus, and we talked about Frontiers of Science for a good half hour.”
“Columbia classes teach you how to think and learn. With so many distinguished faculty members on campus, we’re exposed to many different ways of thinking and teaching styles. Absorbing those and incorporating them into my everyday learning is probably the most important thing I have learned during my years here.”

Harry L.

“The most formidable aspect of my time at Columbia has been interacting with, debating and learning from people (both students and faculty) who think differently than me, are from different corners of the world, are passionate about similar and vastly different things and all want to share their experiences.”

Stephanie G.

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