QuestBridge

QuestBridge Logo

Columbia is proud to be entering our seventh year as a QuestBridge Partner school, and we currently have 56 QuestBridge Scholars on campus and have matched with 123 scholars. QuestBridge is a non-profit organization which identifies high-achieving, low-income students, assists them with the college search and application process and works to connect them to educational opportunities at 35 partner colleges. For more information about QuestBridge, please explore their website.

A commitment to diversity—of every kind—is a long-standing Columbia hallmark. Columbia undergraduates bring with them an enormous range of interests and talents, represent every socioeconomic, racial and ethnic background and hail from all fifty states and from all over the world. In the current first-year class, fifteen percent of our students are the first in their families to go to college. Over half of our first-year students self-identified as students of color, making Columbia one of the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher learning in the world. Columbia also has the highest percentage of Pell Grant recipients of any Ivy League or private research university. In our quest to make Columbia accessible to all students, especially those from low- and middle-income families, Columbia has eliminated loans for all students receiving financial aid, whatever their family income, and replaced them with University grants. Families with calculated incomes below $60,000 and with typical assets will not have to make any parent contribution for the cost of education and those with an income between $60,000 and $100,000 have a significantly reduced parent contribution.

Frequently Asked Questions

We have prepared a list of common questions from QuestBridge applicants. If your question is not answered in the Frequently Asked Questions, please e-mail questbridge@columbia.edu.

We hope you will consider Columbia as you explore the QuestBridge Program. 

Advice from Students

Get to know each school you’re considering inside and out – this includes academics, the student body, the location of the school, and the “vibe” on campus. Interact with the institution – reach the materials, speak with admissions officers, meet with students, and try to visit campus. Do anything you can do to determine if the atmosphere is one in which you can be successful and enjoy your college experience.”

I would advise students going through the college application process to trust themselves. I remember when I was applying to schools that everyone had a strong opinion: my parents' friends, my teachers, even my hairdresser. Ultimately, you know best what is right for you. Listen to what people are saying, but if you have a gut feeling that you know what you want, it's okay to ignore everyone else and follow your dreams.”